THE VERY BEST KOREAN RESTAURANTS IN BERLIN

The Very Best Korean Restaurants In Berlin – Berlin has a surprisingly high number of Korean restaurants and a wide variety of them at that. Everything from pop-ups, to trendy street food spots, to family-owned “hole-in-the-wall” type establishments, and even, more high-end dining experiences.

So what are the best Korean restaurants in Berlin? I consider myself somewhat of an aficionado after being in a relationship with a Korean guy for more than seven years. I helped cook and of course, ate many a Korean meal with his family. While I don’t mourn the demise of our time together, I miss his mother’s cooking a whole lot. As such, I often seek out Korean places in Berlin to satisfy my food cravings.

Recommended reading: Berliners complain about the lack of good Mexican restaurants in Berlin & fiercely argue about which one is best. Check out our favs! Also, check out our guide to the best craft beer bars in Berlin.

YUMMY KOREAN RESTAURANTS IN BERLIN

If you’re a fan of Korean food like me, use this list of Korean restaurants in Berlin to do a fun food tour of the city. Be sure to come back and share your reviews in the comments too. Tell us about your favorite dishes, if you found the food to be authentic, if the service was good, and more. 

Serving up Korean street food, Angry Chicken has all the comfort food to fill your belly when you’re suffering from a nasty hangover. With chicken wings marinated in various sauces ranging from sweet to spicy, as well as burgers, their menu also features a potato hot dog (yes!), kimchi, and pickled radish.

Locations:

  • Oranienstr. 16, 10999
  • Rosa-Luxemburg-Str. 7, 10178

This budget-friendly establishment doesn’t look like much from the outside, yet this family-owned Korean restaurant is often mentioned as the best place to get authentic Korean food in Berlin. The friendly staff at Café Ogam dole out generous portions of traditional food that keeps bringing their customers back. Favorite dishes from online reviewers are kimchi pancakes, pork soup, and naengmyeon – a cold noodle soup.

Location: Emserstr. 40, 12051

Choi offers one of those finer dining experiences you undertake when you want to spoil yourself. With three set menus, one vegetarian, one fish, and one omnivore-themed, each dish served is perfectly paired with wine. Some highlights of their current omnivore-themed menu are sous vide octopus and seasonal vegetables ceviche in a watery kimchi sauce, as well as, cooked marinated pork belly with wild garlic chili paste sauce.

Location: Fehrbellinerstr. 4, 10119

At Crazy Kims, they take pride in their classic Bibimbap and that it’s not served steaming hot in a stone bowl which they maintain makes vegetables soggy. In addition to Bibimbap, they offer Korean BBQ and a wide assortment of Korean side dishes (think kimchi, pickled radish, rice cakes, etc.), even dubbing themselves the “Banchan specialists”. This family-owned business is also known for its friendly service, which can be difficult to find in Berlin.

Location: Muskauerstr. 13, 10997

DaBangg is not only a renowned tea house but a highly rated Korean restaurant in Berlin that only uses fresh and even, gluten-free ingredients. Their evening menu features mains like bulgogi, udon soup, pancakes, and pork belly. Best of all, all dishes come with six different sides.

Location: Hedwigstr. 18, 12159

A female-owned business headed by Korean American Lauren Lee, Fraulein Kimchi offers Korean Street food with a fusion twist. With a restaurant, catering business, and food truck, you can get all sorts of unique and delicious treats from them like a crispy pink tofu kimchi burger or their signature Kimchikäsespätzle which combines kimchi with the traditional German Käsespätzle. You’ll also find bibimbap bowls, with the pulled pork bowl and the spicy chicken bowls being customer favorites.

Location: Gürtelstr. 10, 13088 Berlin

Gokan in Berlin Schöneberg provides homemade authentic Korean BBQ, as well as a number of sides like tofu salad, Gunmandu, pancakes, and doenjang-guk – a soybean soup. Of course, you can go for some classic bibimbap or flavourful stew.

Location: Leberstr. 9, 10829

Guten Dag is another budget-friendly Berlin establishment serving Korean fried chicken. Operating a kiosk under the tracks along Schönhauser Alle, visit Guten Dag for filling fried chicken snacks with a nice variety of sauces, as well as kimchi and french fries.

Location: Unter den Gleisen, Schönhauser Allee 71-72, 10437

Kimchi Princess dishes out Korean BBQ in a really beautiful setting with red walls and dark wood tables. Their website says “traditional meets contemporary meets yummy” and we’re all here for it. Starters include mandu (Korean dumplings), tofu fried kimchi & pork belly, and a miso soup with salmon, tofu, seaweed & spring onion. BBQ includes not just bulgogi, but galbi as well and mains feature different flavors of jigae, a Korean stew.

Location: Skalitzerstr. 36, 10999

Kochu Karu is a MICHELIN star restaurant offering a unique and mouthwatering combination of Korean and Spanish cuisines. You can choose from a four to seven-course menu (with an optional wine pairing) consisting of a main, side dishes, and a dessert. Mains include dishes like the Joselito Iberico Secreto, with green pepper and Ssamjang butter, while sides feature grilled aubergine with cherry tomatoes as kimchi and lemon tahini or the Galician veal tartare, with sweetbread, Zang Azi, and hemp oil. If you want to go all out, you can also go for a cheese plate.

Location: Eberswalderstr. 35, 10437

Another great spot for fried chicken is at Kokio, where you can choose from a bunch of different sauces like sweet chili, soy garlic, super spicy,  and soy wasabi. Pair your chicken with varying sides like kimchi, Korean dumplings, and sweet potato fries. Kokio recommends pairing your dinner with a good beer to complete your overall experience.

Location: Hagenauerstr. 9, 10435

This cute and cozy Korean café in Berlin’s Prenzlauer Berg is the place to come for some yummy Korean sweets and good coffee. Popular choices at Lia Ppang include the hodugwaja cookies with red bean paste and walnuts, green tea cheesecake, sweet buns, homemade strawberry milk, and more.

Location: Chorinerstr. 45 Erdgeschoß links Einheit, 10435 

Mmaah, another popular Korean BBQ and street food establishment, has quite a number of locations throughout Berlin. Some of their comfort food styled offerings are the bulgogi, marinated beef with rice and salad and the hotgogi, marinated spicy chicken with rice and salad. You can also find mandu (Korean dumplings) and seasoned potatoes on the menu.

Locations: 

  • Simon-Dach-Str. 11, 10245 
  • Nollendorfstr. 31, 10777 
  • Wienerstr. 31, 10999
  • Kiehlufer 75, 12059 
  • Columbiadamm 160, 10965 
  • Elisabeth-Schwarzhaupt-Platz 5, 10115

Nanum is something of a special place that offers an upscale and extraordinary dining experience. Like some of the more upscale places on our list of the best Korean restaurants in Berlin, NaNum offers a set menu with vegetarian options during the week and fish and vegetarian options on the weekends. You can add a wine pairing option to your meal, with all wines being carefully sourced natural wines. They also have their own garden where they grow their own vegetables, as well as a ceramic studio where they create dishware used to serve their meals. Their menu changes every six – eight weeks, where you can find mouth watering specials like striped bass, dry aged Golden Trout, radish kimchi, and more.

Location: Lindenstr. 90, 10969 Berlin

LOCATIONS

Use our custom Google Map as a guide to finding the most popular Korean restaurants in Berlin.

What do you think about this list of places to get Korean food in Berlin? Are we missing any good spots? Tell us about your favorites in the comments.

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About Our Author

  • A Canadian who’s been living in Berlin for 10 years, Cheryl’s moved here not once, but twice. During her time in Berlin, she’s had five different visas and worked as both a freelancer and permanent employee for a number of Berlin companies. She even managed to find a new job during the pandemic. That said, Cheryl knows what it takes to move to Berlin and find work.

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